Posted In: Digital Brand Management, Domain Name Reseller Programs, Domain Name Strategy, Generic Domains, Generic Top Level Domains, New gTLDs

How much does .SUCKS suck?

The Internet is debuting a new domain name in June called .sucks. Media outlets have been rather critical of the new domain name and have a fair share of opinions on the topic. The Internet currently is looming with individuals thirsty to share their fair share of criticism to the world whether it be positive or negative. The company that is selling the new domain is charging a whopping  $2500 dollars for interested parties per address. On June 1st,  the domain name will go into what is a called a Sunrise period , which will give interested parties a chance to buy the name before anyone else does. In reality this should be no problem for major companies and celebrities, but what about the small business? Doesn’t it seem excessive for one to have to pay a high price for preventative bad press?

A major discussion online in regards to .sucks is that it is just a reflection of the way business relationships are forming between customer and company within the current environment. It gives the customer the opportunity to voice their concern in a quick manner and ensures just like social media that no business is out of the all seeing eye of Internet scrutiny.  While I do believe we are in the era of micro-communication between the customer and the company the connotation of negative complaints on .sucks doesn’t leave room for positive feedback. If the .sucks gTLD should be a reflection of our micro-communication environment it should leave room for satisfied customers.

I must admit a rather positive advancement for the .sucks gTLD is that it is not open for the porn industry. That is right… you heard no porn.  Although this would be a rather lucrative use of the gTLD it is not going to be available for that use. The presence of .PORN and .ADULT should be sufficient for the porn industry. Also another interesting schematic for the name is that it is not illegal to buy a personal name. So individuals must now protect themselves by buying a preventative .sucks gTLD in the hopes that they do not fall victims to Internet scrutiny and identity theft.

The positive of .sucks is that it is going to field a rather large amount of hilarious commentary from individuals who are upset and want ratification online.  I believe this would be the ultimate positive outcome of this new name. As long as this gTLD remains a positive source for individuals and doesn’t turn into an all out open war on companies, which is highly possible, this could be a major Internet success. Once the burn of being forced to buy this domain rubs off, hopefully some companies will actually put the gTLD into their company repertoire of places to complain to.